Y is for Thorn / Word Economy (poem)

I recently completed the A-Z Challenge of writing a poem every day throughout April 2015 themed on a letter of the alphabet. Having the supportive friends that I do (!), one then pointed out that in Old English there was ANOTHER letter that slowly fell in to disuse through the middle ages, even though we still see it’s legacy today in English village signs. This letter is known as “thorn” and represents the “th” sound, originally written as “þ” but then mutated into a “y”. So, Nick challenged me to write one more poem for this alphabet collection and wrote his own too – check it out here: https://babbitman.wordpress.com/2015/05/07/y-is-for-thorn/

The deadline for this was the þirteenþ of May (unfortunately not a Þurþsday)…

Word economy
My good friend Nick has made a case
To crown the thorn back into place
As letter number 27
(Bring it back from letter heaven)

“Why use two instead of one?”
Is how your argument be-gun

I think you’re right! But let’s go further
And check that every letter’s worth a
Place in the new alphabet

(One in which our needs are met
Without the need to get upset)

So we’ll keep the thorn, but oþers go.
þis is how our language grows.

We’ll join the Yanks and drop most “U”s
Colour/ color – you can choose!
We’ll phase out “X” at þe start of words
(þat will please þe blogging herds)

We’ll drop þe “H” (so many do)
“C” kan go, and so kan “Q”
(þe “Q” of “quay” makes no sense to me.
Let’s ekonomise and kall it “key”)

Is this too much? Would you endorse it?
Or does language grow best,
If you don’t force it?

thorn

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Author: Al Lane

Writer, Poet, Daydreamer

7 thoughts on “Y is for Thorn / Word Economy (poem)”

  1. Very good sir! Love the way you incorporated the thorn and then kicked out others too. Although, it did start to look a bit Orwellian towards the end (which is probably your point) 😉

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